Blue Sunshine- Original Negatives Found, 4k restoration in the works!!!

Original Camera Negative for Jeff Lieberman’s, 1978, Blue Sunshine, FOUND!!

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Anyway, for those of you who don’t have much time, I will first skip all the bullshit! I just wanted to confirm the rumors that have been circulating, although I have not been able to get on Facebook or the blog as much lately, I have gotten some email and a few calls regarding this. I think it is a rather awesome film discovery and worthy of some major press and fan satisfaction. Recently, I have discovered the original Picture Negative to Jeff Lieberman’s, 1978, Blue Sunshine. There has not been a physical transfer or scan, but based on the actual elements, they look absolutely great, which is a huge start. This is a famous and sought after film, and one that the horror community has embraced as sort of a cult classic. The bottom line is that film is set in LA, it has murderous maniacs, caused by some LSD they took, need I say more! Combine that with this brand new find and were talking a serious Blu Ray Release!!

So,”YES”!… The Original Camera Negative for Jeff Lieberman’s, 1978, Blue Sunshine, has been FOUND, alive and well and heading to the lab for a truly glorious restoration project. Details will follow when finalized, but the simple approach is a 4k scan, followed by Davinci timing, which it will need plenty of and then after we complete the timing, we can decide on what levels of digital restoration we need to perform, like scratch and dirt removal. It is something we need to think about before we even start the scan because today, many of the higher end scanners have a technology from Kodak called DICE, and this is a very expensive and even a complex addition to the scanners, and it basically enables the scanner to effectively remove dirt, scratches and other flaws during the actual scanning process(I think of it like a digital wet gate). You can search “film scanning DICE technology” and learn more about it. But essentially, when this option used, the scanner automatically slows down and adjusts the rate that the film goes across the gate. During this slower scan, much of the flaw that would take weeks to remove manually with digital software, can now be done with DICE. Of course, this can add anywhere from $10-20 dollars to each minute of scan time, so it is a very expensive option, so we have not yet decided if this negative will be scanned that way.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

Well, “when it rains it pours”, is how the saying goes and for my small and rather intimate archival efforts, I can admit that this is true. These past 6 months have been amazing, from discovering a crisp 35mm print of an American literary and cinematic classic like Orson Welle’s, Falstaff(1965) to the negative of an American underground-cult classic like Jeff Lieberman’s, Blue Sunshine(1978), at Distribpix Inc we are certainly doing something right and that is literally unearthing some of cinema’s lost film treasures and elements.

Always traveling all over the place to retrieve film elements, look at new ones and archive collections takes a toll on the body and mind. It is like going on a scavenger hunt and if your successful , you need a 56 foot trailer truck, fork lift, 5 thousand dollars and a bottle of Advil, to simply ‘move it out’. Unlike many other worthy and valuable hobbies, like stamp collecting, where an entire collection of rare value can be carried in a briefcase and stored in a safe, a film collection needs a large space, a warehouse, a film storage facility, it’s a lot, and by film collecting standards I am rather small potatoes, housing much of a 3000 square foot warehouse with random films element and always convincing myself that I have room for me( which I do)!

And what is great, which is not that uncommon in film discoveries from the Distribpix archive, is that most of the time we are able to track down the origin of the films elements and find out where they originated (mainly through files, record and research) and how they ended up where they are. In most cases, it can be it’s own show or episode, it can be that amazing and detailed, other times its rather simple and straightforward. This is exactly the case with the negative for Blue Sunshine. For me, this was a simple forensic analysis and the determination was made through files that were from my private records, but after through research, the same info was also found to be easily available on the internet.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

Analysis of the discovery of the Film Elements for Blue Sunshine (Original Picture Negative):

Here is what I can tell you about the life of the original picture negative for Blue Sunshine. Again, this is concise and to the point, but the actual story like many, is packed with details. In the late 1970’s when Jeff Leiberman had the original film negatives, he had utilized the services of Movie Lab in NYC to not only strike prints, but also store and ship prints. Movie Lab was one of the major go to labs of the day, and provided services to almost every film company during the 70’s and 80’s, from Hollywood to New York.

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Their bicoastal location allowed prolific producers and directors on both coasts to more easily churn out pictures in the booming exploitation market. In many cases, these local labs thrived on the business of exploitation filmmakers(more on the cheaper, action style films and X-rated adult features), as the demand for this niche and theatrical prints was at it’s peek, as grindhouse after grindhouse dotted the streets of NYC and many other cities across America. America wanted it’s filth and they needed it quickly and easily, the only way to make it accessible was to have prints struck and in some cases hundreds of them for theaters all over the world! Today, we take for granted that much of the HD quality video we all watch on our tablets and mobile devices is streaming from some invisible Cloud that lingers in the atmosphere, of course I am speaking of cloud based servers and storage. But, back in the 70’s and 80s’s, if you want to see the shit, if you wanted anything to do with it, you went to the theaters. It was an experience. It was a way of life, this was just before and during the infancy of the home video revolution(VHS). This is how America and most viewed films, it was a place for the commoner and the cinephile, the raincoated-pervert or the business man. If you wanted it, you came out to see it, no way around!! I was fortunate enough to be a youngster around it, I saw it and experienced NYC and Times Square in the late 70’s and early 80’s, man it was incredible. Anyway, there is no way of getting around technology, don’t fight it, embrace it.

Back to the story……so while the labs were always busy the began to  depend more and more on the success of the filmmakers and producers, and as these filmmakers would move on from one project to another, it was not uncommon to have original elements either stored or held at specialty film labs. Movie Lab was that place for Blue Sunshine, as well as literally thousands of other films elements from studios big and small, from around the world.

In the early 90’s, when Movie Lab had gone out of business, which is it’s own story, there were still thousands of film elements that were either abandoned, not claimed, unknown or just not identified correctly and became the property of Movie Lab and/or their responsibly to get rid of it, as they space the inhabited for so long was now to be vacated.  So in the early 90’s, after a business deal was made between Distribix Inc. and Movie Lab, all of these various film elements were brought by trailer trucks to a warehouse in New Jersey, owned by Distribpix. These elements were stored for a while and eventually ended up in some different areas, some stayed in NYC, and many went to Los Angeles and then we followed the paper the trail to Seattle’s, Something Weird Video, where they would stay for approximately 25 years, hidden and tucked away with thousands of other boxes in storage areas, filled with film elements, ranging from negatives, to prints, mag tracks, trailers, work prints, etc.

The simple reason they ended up in Seattle, at SWV, was due to the fact that in the early 1990’s a young and aggressive businessman( as well as cinephile, professional collector, comic book hound, punk rock expert, and well known video bootlegger) by the name of Mike Vraney had contacted Arthur, the owner of Distribpix Inc, as Mike wanted to distribute some of the early Distribpix sex exploitation films, as well as try and exploit the new Movie Lab acquisitions as well. While I was just getting out of junior high school around that time, I was still aware of what was going on, to a degree, now my tenure and files can confirm everything. Anyway, Mike Vraney and Distribpix had a very pleasant relationship, and I remember times when Mike, Dave Friedman and my father and brother, would often all rendevoux once a year in the Big Apple, where they would romp around, eat and drink. Mike was a true character and I have thought about him so much since his passing just over 15 months ago. He leaves behind an amazing legacy and film collection, and a good portion of those elements are owned by Distribpix Inc. Anyway, after Mike’s passing I had spent almost a year going back and forth to Seattle every 6 weeks or so, to spend time with Lisa, Mike’s wife and owner of SWV, as well as Tim Lewis, the head of operations. We had some great times. I also got to be at Mike’s memorial and oother events to remember his life. While in Seattle this past summer, I had also been looking through elements and gathering films as well. In July of 2014, after spending 3-4 consecutive days on my hands and knees, I was elated to find a box that was labeled with Blue Sunshine.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

Blue Sunshine, 1978, Original Camera Negative.

I don’t exactly recall why I was looking for it or why it was on my ‘keep an eye out for” list, maybe because Jeff had mentioned it to a friend of mine, as he knew I would be scouring through the Movie Lab elements with a fine tooth comb, but Lisa was also aware of the fact that they might be there. I mean Jeff Leiberman even had a hunch, as he would know best and he was right. I immediately brought the box to Lisa where it was locked away in her office until I was able to have it securely package and shipped to the east coast. Where is sits beside me and awaits a 2 hour drive too the lab in just over 48 hours! That is the life line of these elements, I hope you enjoyed this story. I am want to thank Mike/Lisa/Tim from SWV for always being such solid people to me and great hosts and I want to thank and congratulate Jeff Lieberman on the confirmation that his original negative not only exists, but will be getting a grand restoration and one done with love, passion and care to detail.

While this is a great find and the elements are now safe with me they will be going home to daddy!! After the restoration, which is complete I will personally drive the negatives back to Jeff’s home, where the reels can live with Jeff, sandwiched between some of his other prized elements he owns. I just hope his film elements for Remote Control, will not be too jealous of his brand new and gorgeous looking 35mm-celluloid addition to the family!

More details to follow. Thank you for reading.

http://www.distribpix.com

The Billy Bagg Double Feature: The Adult Films of Bill Lustig

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The Billy Bagg Double Feature (The Violation of Claudia/Hot Honey),presented by Distribpix Inc. will be the first DVD package of the Sweetheart Theatres DVD line, a line which celebrates the erotic films and cinemas that operated under the Sweetheart Theatre umbrella. This first double feature installment, takes us back to the Word Theater, for a WORLD PREMIERE of both titles, one took placed in 1977, the other in 1978.

Before he became one of the most famous and important horror filmmakers of the 1980s, Bill Lustig(Manic Cop, Vigilante) directed these two X rated oddities. Both films have been newly restored in 2K from their original negatives and each audio commentary with Bill Lustig is moderated by Danishfilm director, Nicolas Winding Refn (Drive, Only God Forgives, Valhalla Rising, Bronson).

The package will be available for pre-order next week, August 25th, 2014. The product may even ship as early as next week, as well.

In THE VIOLATION OF CLAUDIA (1977), the incredible Sharon Mitchell stars as Claudia, a beautiful, wealthy housewife who enters the seedy and bizarre world of prostitution with the help of her manipulative tennis coach (Jamie Gillis).Also starring Crystal Sync, Long Jeane Silvers and Don Peterson.(63min)

BONUS FEATURES: •Director Commentary with Bill Lustig and filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn •Original Theatrical Trailer (Hot Version) •Sildeshow & Ephemera Gallery ______________________________________________

In HOT HONEY (1978), young Honey (Heather Young) refuses to put out for her boyfriend,preferring to tend for her wheelchair bound brother (Jamie Gillis). But soon, Honey begins a strange sexual awakening, seducing men and women alike! Co-starring Serenaand Robin Byrd.(71 min)

BONUS FEATURES: •Director Commentary with Bill Lustig and filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn •Original Theatrical Trailer (Cool Version) •Bonus Podcast with Bill Lustig

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www.distribpix.com

Packaging FILM Elements- From the Distribpix Archives

Expose Me Lovely-Packaging FILM Elements for Shipping

It is not uncommon to have print requests for theatrical screenings all over the country, and in many cases we are able to accommodate. About 2 weeks ago, I was told that I needed to send a MINT Print, to a theater in Chicago. I was to send the parcel Fed Ex, with insurance and needed to get it out ASAP.

As for archival elements they can really come in many shapes and sizes, some are in suitcase style film carriers, others in tins, some on spools, and some just naked( plastic bags). To be blunt, if you care about film in general, regardless of what  the content, you must be gentle when transporting, handling, and or transferring.  Although one can only do so much to protect their film elements during transfers–, accidents happen—  deliver guys drop boxes, parcels get wet, they get delayed, etc, etc.

Being the nutty/anal retentive/OCD- that I am, I tend to take everything I do to the max, but in many cases, this is not a detriment, but just the opposite. My packing method shows that if something is worth doing, it is worth doing right.  There may be some that disagree with my technique and think it is overkill, but I think it is essential. So much of American Film has been destroyed, lost and damaged beyond repair, so for the small percentage that still survives, it is vital to treat elements like valuables.

Here is how to pack archival film, to insure that it arrives at it’s location in perfect shape!

DETAILED STEPS AND PHOTOS TO TRANSPORT ARCHIVAL FILM ELEMENTS:

STEP 1. If using a cardboard box to transport elements, make sure the box is in good condition and if possible use an extra thick, corrugated box.  This films is rather long and and contains 5 full reels, weighing about 50 pounds. A strong box is essential, and in my case, I use the double-box method.

Expose Me Lovely Film Print, Mint condition, Wound tight, on 5 reels. Make sure reels are labeled well.

1.Expose Me Lovely Film Print, Mint condition, Wound tight, on 5 reels. Make sure reels are labeled well.

STEP 2.  Stack Reels inside the box and use pieces of cardboard, newspaper and or bubble wrap, to reduce friction and or uneccessary movement. This may seem over kill, but the truth is that many theaters and film festivals, don’t always return the elements with same love as we send them, so the extra steps I take, will help that much more. For example, I make sure to mark my boxes with ” DO NOT THROW AWAY THIS BOX!”, because I want them to re-use them and basically, the work is done.

Elements packed inside corrugated box, newspaper padding at corners, notice extra cardboard supports at sides.

SETP2. Elements packed inside corrugated box, newspaper padding at corners, notice extra cardboard supports at sides.

STEP 3. Complete the packing the box to the top, pack down the paper and make sure it is tight. Cut pieces of Cardboard, so they cover the top of the box, and essentially you are creating a home of protection around the film elements.

STEP 3. Film elements stacked and box covered with Cardboard scraps for extra padding and support.

STEP 3. Film elements stacked and box covered with Cardboard scraps for extra padding and support.

STEP 4. Close the box and continue to secure the box with heavy duty packing tape, I recommend one with reinforcing fibers. This will become your first box and essentially this can be shipped as is, but I like to take it a few steps further.

STEP 4: First box packaged and reinforced, marked clearly, and in many cases, this can ship perfectly in this condition.

STEP 4: First box packaged and reinforced, marked clearly, and in many cases, this can ship perfectly in this condition.

STEP 5:  Take a heavy duty garbage liner, or plastic packing, and wrap the box, creating an extra barrier for accidental liquid encounters. Cardboard is like a sponge and if dropped in a puddle, or left wet for a few days in travel, it can soak through to the film inside.

STEP 5: Film Elements wrapped in heavy duty plastic, creating a moisture barrier.

STEP 5: Film Elements wrapped in heavy duty plastic, creating a moisture barrier.

STEP 6: Take another cardboard box, that is a bit larger than the film element box. Use bubble wrap to create a padded nook for your elements box. This is easy to do, only takes a few minutes and something I have adopted recently.

STEP 6: Take a larger box, use babble wrap to make a nook, and place archival film element box #1, into the larger box. this creates a padded nook for your elements.

STEP 6: Take a larger box, use babble wrap to make a nook, and place archival film element box #1, into the larger box. this creates a padded nook for your elements.

STEP 7: Continue to further pad and close the second box or OUTER BOX, as you did the first, use the same tape to mark the outer box and you are ready to ship!

STEP 7:  Complete the packing of the OUTER BOX, use extra bubble wrap for top padding. and close with heavy duty tape.

STEP 7: Complete the packing of the OUTER BOX, use extra bubble wrap for top padding. and close with heavy duty tape.

STEP 8: Your films elements are as safe as they can be for their journey. It is recommended to put a note in the box, for the projectionist, with any requests or comments.  It only takes about 8-10 minutes to do this properly and if you have all of this material laying around, like I do, it is that much easier.

STEP 8: OUTER BOX, ready to ship, I like to add FRAGILE stickers and write "HEAVY", the total box weight is 49 pounds.

STEP 8: OUTER BOX, ready to ship, I like to add FRAGILE stickers and write “HEAVY”, the total box weight is 49 pounds.

Barbara Broadcast- Film Restoration Grabs- AMAZING!

BARBARA BROADCAST FILM RESTORATION COMPARISONS- BEFORE and AFTER!!

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This latest project and one that is almost complete has taken longer than usual, partially due to the overwhelming success of The Opening of Misty Beethoven campaign and release. Also, I spent quite a but more time that i expected on digital film restoration, not that it was in terrible shape, but my OCD kicked in hard and when dealing with these 35 mm blow up internegatives, there are thousands of instances of scratches and dirt, etc. With these Henry Paris films, the original processing and blow ups were done at the same lab, which is known for it’s sloppy handling and inconsistent transfers, etc. This is going back to the 70’s. Anyway, since I was taking Barbara to Blu, I wanted her to look as good as she can and while it took a bit longer, the results speak for themselves. Those long drives to the film lab, being totally engulfed in the restoration of the pix and track, and immersing myself into every detail of this project, will prove to be the key to Barbara. I intend on posting the final details of both Barbara packages, the official release and pre-order dates, as well as answers to many FAQ’s I have been getting.

Without going any further, I just wanted to post some of these screen grabs from the standard DVD version of Barbara Broadcast(VCA/Hustler), that has been circulating and sold for the last decade or so. I will also post the brand new screen grabs from the fully restored version of Barbara Broadcast for DVD/BLU from Distribpix Inc.  The comparisons between the 2 are simply incredible. As usual, the color, clarity, grain and of course aspect ratio are all corrected. If this does not convince anyone that it is essential to upgrade to the new versions, I am not sure what will. It is UNCUT, and now each frame is in the proper aspect ratio, where before you did not even get the entire frame, it was cropped and masked at the wrong ratio and clips much of the frame. I am not sure why they would have even done that, in many cases it is to save money and or lack of knowledge on the part of the transfer/authoring house.

While you are looking through the before and after shots, please keep in mind that none of this amazing restoration work would not be possible if it were not for the tireless efforts and commitment to dedication on the  part of Process Blue Labs, in Bridgeport, CT. Thank you so very much Ryan and Joe!

I hope you enjoy these comparisons.

old version, standard transfer, incorrect framing, a fake copyright added on after the fact as well.

old version, standard transfer, incorrect framing, a fake copyright added on after the fact as well.

New Version- HD GRAB, color correction, digital restoration.

New Version- HD GRAB, color correction, digital restoration.

Old versions, wrong aspect ratio, although color looks rich, it is not even close to accurate. The dining room was very bright, as this film was shot at nights. Also, Zebedy Colt's suit is dark grey, but it is really light grey!

Old versions, wrong aspect ratio, although color looks rich, it is not even close to accurate. The dining room was very bright, as this film was shot at nights. Also, Zebedy Colt’s suit is dark grey, but it is really light grey!

HD Grab, color is on point, grain is very rich(super16mm), and of course we can see the 1.85:1 proper framing.

HD Grab, color is on point, grain is very rich(super16mm), and of course we can see the 1.85:1 proper framing.

Old VCA version, same old song and dance, improper aspect ratio.

Old VCA version, same old song and dance, improper aspect ratio.

New HD grab, look at how nice his facial colors are represented. Alan Marlow, a Metzger stalwart, as a friend of Tony's

New HD grab, look at how nice his facial colors are represented. Alan Marlow, a Metzger stalwart, as a friend of Tony’s

OLD VCA version. I think the fact that the entire film is presented in the wrong aspect ratio is most bothersome- this is  very close to a square??

OLD VCA version. I think the fact that the entire film is presented in the wrong aspect ratio is most bothersome- this is very close to a square??

AAAH, finally,  the way it was shot and meant to look. Bringing a film or scene back to life, is such a satisfying feeling, although it can be very unrewarding at times, as people tend to overlook the hard work.

AAAH, finally, the way it was shot and meant to look. Bringing a film or scene back to life, is such a satisfying feeling, although it can be very unrewarding at times, as people tend to overlook the hard work.

Grab from VCA DVD, wrong aspect ratio, very dark, sort of flat. What bothers me the most, is that for 10 years, no one complained about the framing, but if I go ahead and do that, holy shit, the fans go fucking nuts!!LOL.

Grab from VCA DVD, wrong aspect ratio, very dark, sort of flat. What bothers me the most, is that for 10 years, no one complained about the framing, but if I go ahead and do that, holy shit, the fans go fucking nuts!!LOL.

Brand new HD grab from Distribpix Inc. I must say, very accurate color, (thanks to  Joe and Ryan at PB), correct framing, detail, and totally director approved.

Brand new HD grab from Distribpix Inc. I must say, very accurate color, (thanks to Joe and Ryan at PB), correct framing, detail, and totally director approved.

OLD version, poor framing, no one cared that they were cutting off much of the frame? Constance is faded and dark.

OLD version, poor framing, no one cared that they were cutting off much of the frame? Constance is faded and dark.

Brand new HD screengrab, we see Constance in the bondage scene with proper aspect ration, color grading, and richer grain detail.

Brand new HD screengrab, we see Constance in the bondage scene with proper aspect ration, color grading, and richer grain detail.

Old VCA DVD grab, from the night club/disco scene, a bit dark, wrong aspect ratio, and again, looks flat.

Old VCA DVD grab, from the night club/disco scene, a bit dark, wrong aspect ratio, and again, looks flat.

Brand new HD Transfer, roberta and Barbara in the disco. This is how Henry Paris envisioned this scene.

Brand new HD Transfer, roberta and Barbara in the disco. This is how Henry Paris envisioned this scene.

Old version, wrong aspect ratio, not true blacks, no grain. Bobby Astyr looks so much better than this.

Old version, wrong aspect ratio, not true blacks, no grain. Bobby Astyr looks so much better than this.

Brand New HD transfer, correct aspect ration of 1.85:1 and color corrected. Now it looks great. Check Please!!

Brand New HD transfer, correct aspect ration of 1.85:1 and color corrected. Now it looks great. Check Please!!

Old VCA version, ending credits- what more can I say?

Old VCA version, ending credits- what more can I say?

Brand New HD Screen grab of the credits at the end of the film. THE END!

Brand New HD Screen grab of the credits at the end of the film. THE END!

The Opening of Misty Beethoven- 2 DVD set, Dual Layer Blu Ray and CD Soundtrack

This is the ultimate, the tops, the absolute best treatment to any re-release of an adult film. The amount of love and passion that went into restoring the film, the art, the campaign, producing top notch extras, culling and licensing music tracks, etc. We have truly uncovered much of the story behind Misty, and have restored the film to look better than the day it was released theatrically. It has been the most involved project ever taken on by Distribpix Inc. and the DVD and Blu packages, have taken about 6 months, and even longer in cases of the CD, but we are finally preparing to bring all 3 of these epic packages to market!

Sorry for the wait, but like anything that is treated with love and care and passion, it can never be rushed, once you rush, you take the risk of jeopardizing the task at hand. We stuck to our gameplan from the very beginning of the Metzger restorations, and for Misty, we did the same, although we were a bit ambitious in some of our goals, it totally paid off. The idea as many of you know, is to treat these releases with the same gusto as a company like Universal or Criterion, many people say we are like the Criterion of adult and sexploitation, because we treat the films the same way and do even better restorations than some of the majors, and not too mention the extras. Are they the best, most professionaly produced videos ever made, of course not? But they are fucking awesome extras and if you are a fan of learning about a film and you enjoy extras, you are in luck. We have a mix of so much content, it was a very difficult authoring procedure for both the blu and DVD’s- as there are lots of menus and sub menus, but the content is kick ass!!

Remember, if this was just about turning a quick profit, I could have had all of these transferred in HD and put on single economy version DVD-5’s-with no extras, to whore out to the adult market, but anyone can do that, and they do it every day. Where is the fun in that? Where is the challenge? Those guys don’t love film, and they don’t care, it is about a dollar, and that is fine. It works for them. I was in that market for a long time, and it is not a fun place. For the most part, the DVD buyers are clueless, and would not know a Metzger from a Max Hardcore!!

For me, I would rather create something unique, special, and harvest the best package I can to offer the film fans, who enjoy these types of releases- over the top, done with love and care, every aspect of it – right down to the nitty gritty details, it is like you become intimate with the prodcut and borderline obsessed with all aspects of it, no matter how insignificant.

With all of that said, I am proud to say that we are in the final process of production/manufacturing…..material is coming back to the warehouse and project misty packages are being assembled. We are still waiting for the Blu-Ray, which is in production, and it is REGION FREE, as we have customers all over the world and never lock it to any single region.

I am happy and also very burnt out on Misty Beethoven, I love her so much, this film is so amazing. I have literally spent about 5 months straight doing nothing but working on some aspect of Misty Beethoven, hundreds and hundreds of hours(not too mention my partner Ian Culmell, who has a full-time job as well)-(the film transfers, the documentary-scripting, shooting,editing, artwork, weeks of authoring/encoding for Blu-Ray, countless hours of QC, the project misty campaign,etc.). No matter what I will be able to look back at this experience in the future, knowing that I gave it my all and tried very hard, and we think we succeeded on finally showing the world, how a small- independent film company with no funding, can produce amazing packages, on par with other great Hollywood restorations.

If we were able to get some solid and fair distribution channel, we would be able to produce more packages like this, we really enjoy it. But without a firm distribution channel, it is too difficult to balance the profit/loss for a project of this scale. A film like Misty totaly deserves this treatment and quite frankly, so do many other adult films from the golden age of adult filmmaking.

Misty Beethoven- Cool Version- Bathtub Scene FOUND

So the cool version of Misty is alive and well. While we did not do as much color correction and scratch removal on this version. It is still a wonderful version. The only main difference is that the penetration is edited out, replaced by an alternative angle or additional footage, shot for that reason. One of these scenes sought after for decades, is the infamous scene with Misty and Geraldine in the bath tub. Look no further!!